Peripheral Vision Loss

woman in eye exam

Normal sight includes central vision (the field of view straight ahead) and peripheral vision (the field of view outside the circle of central vision). The inability to see within a normal range of view often indicates peripheral vision loss. In severe cases of peripheral vision loss, individuals only see with their central vision, which causes the sensation of looking through a narrow tunnel. For this reason, peripheral vision loss is sometimes referred to as tunnel vision.

Peripheral Vision Loss Signs and Symptoms

The primary symptom of peripheral vision loss is tunnel vision. When this symptom occurs, you are only able to see a small circle straight ahead. You may also have difficulty seeing in low light and have trouble walking.

Peripheral vision loss does not always occur rapidly. As a result, many sufferers do not immediately realize they are experiencing a loss of peripheral vision, and do not receive diagnosis until examined by an eye care professional.

Peripheral Vision Loss Causes

Several conditions cause peripheral vision loss. Some conditions are serious and require immediate treatment, while others will simply clear up on their own. Any loss of vision or change in sight, however, should prompt an immediate examination by an eye care professional to rule out or begin treatment for any serious medical conditions.

Conditions which cause peripheral vision and require medical treatment include glaucoma, damage to the retina, detached retina, retinitis pigmentosa, brain damage due to stroke or loss of blood, occlusions (eye strokes), optic nerve damage, optic neuritis, compressed optic nerve head, and concussions or other head injuries.

In addition to these conditions which can lead to permanent vision loss, some factors cause temporary tunnel vision and may not require medical treatment. These include alcohol and drug use, high levels of adrenalin, extreme stress, panic, and anger. Peripheral vision loss due to these factors will clear up on its own with no treatment.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Eye care professionals diagnose peripheral vision loss by using a field of vision exam to test your range of vision. If peripheral vision loss is detected, the eye care professional will determine the specific cause by performing further medical testing, observation, and by looking at your medical records. Once an underlying cause is determined, an eye care professional will recommend the treatment options. Depending on the cause, this might include surgery, medication, or vision therapy.

Location

Find us on the map

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

10:00 am-2:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Amazing to find a doctor that is informative, thorough, takes his time, and has a great front desk staff. Genuinely cares about his patients. Very professional yet down to earth!"
    Molly U. Tinley Park, IL
  • "I love Insight Family Vision! They are always professional and thorough with their vision tests! Up to date technology and the customer service is outstanding! I have been going there for years!"
    Kathy Schneider
  • "Love Dr. Alles and his lovely staff...been seeing them for many many years and I always feel welcomed. Thank you so much for your service and I highly recommend them."
    Danetta Hardy
  • "Insight Family Vision Care it's the absolute best! Their doctors are amazing and their office staff is always courteous and accommodating. This is the best doctor's office I go to."
  • "Had a great experience. We got an appointment right and away and Dr. Alles took great care of my daughter."
    Erin D.
  • "Very personal. Answer questions I had."
  • "The staff is always pleasant and accommodating. The doctors are very pleasant and have a wonderful bedside manner."
    Beverly P.